News

Violence and Dating Relationships. Impacts to Your Mental Health. Teen Awareness.

“Here are some statistics on dating and relationship violence. Although females are thought to be the only ones who experience abuse and violence in their relationships, the truth is that boys can be abused by their girlfriends as well.”

 

 

Dating violence can take many
forms:

■ Physical: Shoving, hitting,
punching
■ Verbal: Yelling, screaming,
put-downs
■ Emotional: Spreading rumors,
lying, possessiveness
■ Sexual: Unwanted touching
■ Psychological: Manipulation, mind
games, guilt tripping, controlling

In its most extreme forms, dating violence can even lead to stalking,
rape, and murder.

Teens often won’t tell their parents or friends that dating violence is
occurring. They may be embarrassed, ashamed, and confused. It is
important that teens know that a partner does not have the right to tell
him or her whom to see, what to do,or what to wear. No one has the
right to hit or control anyone else.

 

Warning signs of a partner who may become violent include a partner
who:

■ Wants to get serious quickly
■ Will not take “no” for an answer
■ Is jealous and possessive, wants to pick his or her partner’s friends and
activities
■ Is controlling and bossy—makes all the decisions, does not take
others’ opinions seriously, uses put-downs when alone or with friends
■ Uses guilt trips (e.g., “If you really loved me, you would . . .”)
■ Blames the victim for what is wrong (e.g., “It’s because of you that I get
so mad”)
■ Apologizes for violent behavior (e.g., “I promise I’ll never do it again”)

AS A PARENT, IF YOU SUSPECT THAT YOUR
TEENAGER IS INVOLVED IN AN ABUSIVE ROMANTIC RELATIONSHIP:

Give your teenager a chance to talk. Listen quietly to the whole
story.
■ Tell your teenager you are there to help, not to judge.
■ If your teenager does not want to talk with you, help her find
another trusted person to talk with.
■ Focus on your teenager; do not put down the abusive partner. Point
out how unhappy your teenager seems to be while with the partner.
■ If your teenager wants to break up with an abusive partner, advise that
the break be definite and final. Support your teenager’s decision and
be ready to help.
■ Take whatever safety measures are necessary. Have friends available
so your teenager does not have to walk alone. Consider changing
class schedules or getting help from the guidance counselor, school
principal, or the police if necessary.
■ Ask your teen’s school to offer teen dating violence prevention and
intervention programs.

Source: https://www.brightfutures.org/mentalhealth/pdf/families/ad/dating.pdf

For additional resources and support please visit:

  • National Domestic Violence Hotline
    1-800-799-7233
  • Text “start” 88788
    www.thehotline.org
    Relationship violence support & referrals

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